Scales of Visibility – House of Dust

flow2016

Scales of Visibility in Global Indigenous Art 

Flow a new 15-minute performance will be presented as part of the Scales of Visibility in Global Indigenous Art  on Friday October 14th at 6:30pm, and for the exhibition House of Dust by Alison Knowles, The James Gallery, The Center for Humanities, CUNY, New York. Introductory remarks for  the conference begin at 12:45pm, Martin E. Segal Theatre, and aims to explore the ways in which the practices of indigenous artists operate within the globalized platform of contemporary art. How might art practice and art history address encounters between heritage, commodification, and difference as they take root in the careers of indigenous artists working today? Positing indigenous art as an increasingly prominent area in which issues of race, difference, and post-colonial critique are contested and made visible, the symposium brings together scholars, artists, and curators to examine the workings of indigenous art on multiple levels, including: opposition with the national, contact with the international, and solidarity with the global indigenous.

The conference is presented in conjunction with the Vera List Center‘s Indigenous New York, Curatorially Speaking on Saturday, October 15, at the New School.

This event is presented as part of Social Choreography, an interdisciplinary research group that employs public humanities practices and explores narration as a guide for social change. The group is supported by the Mellon Seminar on Public Engagement and  Collaborative Research.

Cosponsored by the Ph.D. Program in Art History; the Rewald Endowment of the Ph.D. Program in Art History; the Social Choreography Mellon Seminar on Public Engagement and Collaborative Research in the Humanities; and the Vera List Center for Arts and Politics at the New School.

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